adobo magazine's Culture Issue available now
Rome Jorge, October 9, 2017 | 4:53pm

Artwork by Aze Ong
Photo by Albert Labrador

adobo magazine explores culture and its various manifestations with this issue: its dances, its music, its cinema, its creative economy, and even its work ethic.

For this issue we feature how National Artist Benedicto Cabrera has been disrupting visual arts with powerful yet subtle political statements and social commentary. Ballet Philippines artistic director and independent filmmaker Paul Morales reveals he is disrupting dance by marrying it with moving pictures. Wanggo Gallaga explores how data driven filmmaking is disrupting cinema. Mike Constantino explains how social media and music apps are disrupting the music industry. And we reveal how the creative industry is disrupting office culture with agile offices, work life integration, flexi-time, and other innovations.

We profile icons such as Ted Royer, Chief Creative Officer at Droga5; Raul M. Castro, Chairman and CEO at McCann Worldgroup Philippines; as well as Ronalee Zarate-Bayani, Global Executive of Modern Marketing & Digital Transformation at The Hershey Company.

We cover the most important creative industry festivals such as the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, the D&AD, the adobo Design Awards Asia, Mad About Awards, and the ASEAN Creative Cities. We also feature the adobo Cup and the rock bands of Lakihan Mo Logo.

From Google's artificial intelligence that monitors toxic comments online to Hakuhodo's Bran Drool exhibition, adobo magazine presents culture in myriad of forms.

Culture is what unifies a people. Outdated notions of what defines a nation or a people through race, religion, or geography inexorably lead to bigotry, xenophobia, sectarianism, and racism. Simply put, if you share the same culture—speak the same language, know the same fairytales, love the same food, sing the same songs, believe in the same values—you belong. Unlike race or religion, culture can be adopted and assimilated and therefore is an inclusive way of defining a people. Culture is the sum total of a people's artistry, tradition, and intellectual achievement.

adobo magazine's Culture Issue available now

Artwork by Aze Ong
Photo by Albert Labrador

adobo magazine explores culture and its various manifestations with this issue: its dances, its music, its cinema, its creative economy, and even its work ethic.

For this issue we feature how National Artist Benedicto Cabrera has been disrupting visual arts with powerful yet subtle political statements and social commentary. Ballet Philippines artistic director and independent filmmaker Paul Morales reveals he is disrupting dance by marrying it with moving pictures. Wanggo Gallaga explores how data driven filmmaking is disrupting cinema. Mike Constantino explains how social media and music apps are disrupting the music industry. And we reveal how the creative industry is disrupting office culture with agile offices, work life integration, flexi-time, and other innovations.

We profile icons such as Ted Royer, Chief Creative Officer at Droga5; Raul M. Castro, Chairman and CEO at McCann Worldgroup Philippines; as well as Ronalee Zarate-Bayani, Global Executive of Modern Marketing & Digital Transformation at The Hershey Company.

We cover the most important creative industry festivals such as the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, the D&AD, the adobo Design Awards Asia, Mad About Awards, and the ASEAN Creative Cities. We also feature the adobo Cup and the rock bands of Lakihan Mo Logo.

From Google's artificial intelligence that monitors toxic comments online to Hakuhodo's Bran Drool exhibition, adobo magazine presents culture in myriad of forms.

Culture is what unifies a people. Outdated notions of what defines a nation or a people through race, religion, or geography inexorably lead to bigotry, xenophobia, sectarianism, and racism. Simply put, if you share the same culture—speak the same language, know the same fairytales, love the same food, sing the same songs, believe in the same values—you belong. Unlike race or religion, culture can be adopted and assimilated and therefore is an inclusive way of defining a people. Culture is the sum total of a people's artistry, tradition, and intellectual achievement.