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Namie Amuro's "Golden Touch" cleverly simulates touch-screen interaction
oliverbayani, June 8, 2015 | 10:34am

JAPAN - This clever music video from Japan’s queen of pop Namie Amuro shows that you don’t actually need a touch-enabled screen to be interactive.

Keep your fingertip at the center of the video and you’ll be laughing about the crazy ways how you'll be part of the scenes, which includes trapping monsters down a manhole, blocking karate chops and some Fruit Ninja action.

We’re not going to ruin the fun for you, so hit that play button - just don't forget to clean your greasy screen after.

The idea fits hand in glove with Amuro's single “Golden Touch,” borrowing some design inspiration from a series of video ads - also aptly named “Touch the Rainbow” - from Skittles back in 2011. Created by BBDO Torronto, that won a Gold Lion at the 2011 Cannes Cyber Lions:

To be fair, the videos only simulates interactiveness. But it’s a reminder that a simple idea well executed has the potential to be remarkably effective, not to mention entertaining.

 

 

Namie Amuro's "Golden Touch" cleverly simulates touch-screen interaction

JAPAN - This clever music video from Japan’s queen of pop Namie Amuro shows that you don’t actually need a touch-enabled screen to be interactive.

Keep your fingertip at the center of the video and you’ll be laughing about the crazy ways how you'll be part of the scenes, which includes trapping monsters down a manhole, blocking karate chops and some Fruit Ninja action.

We’re not going to ruin the fun for you, so hit that play button - just don't forget to clean your greasy screen after.

The idea fits hand in glove with Amuro's single “Golden Touch,” borrowing some design inspiration from a series of video ads - also aptly named “Touch the Rainbow” - from Skittles back in 2011. Created by BBDO Torronto, that won a Gold Lion at the 2011 Cannes Cyber Lions:

To be fair, the videos only simulates interactiveness. But it’s a reminder that a simple idea well executed has the potential to be remarkably effective, not to mention entertaining.